Starting Your Training

Adding an Instrument Rating to your Private Pilot License is a big step toward becoming a safer, more knowledgeable, and more professional pilot. You will learn how to precisely control the aircraft only by reference to instruments, in addition to learning the intricacies of airspace and regulations. With an Instrument Rating, you will feel more comfortable flying in conditions a non-Instrument Rated pilot would certainly consider a "no-go." As an instrument pilot you will gain valuable and advanced knowledge and skills that will make your flying safer, more convenient, and more versatile.

What Are the Eligibility Requirements?

  • Hold at least a current Private Pilot certificate.
  • Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language.
  • Hold at least a third-class medical certificate.

What Are the Steps to Obtain an Instrument Rating?

To obtain an Instrument Rating, you must complete the following:

  • An aeronautical knowledge exam, administered by the FAA
  • At least fifty (50) hours of cross-country1 flight time
  • At least forty (40) hours of actual or simulated instrument time
  • Instrument flight training with an authorized instructor
  • Practical test preparation
  • Practical test (aka. checkride)

What Aeronautical Experience is Required?

  • At least fifty (50) hours of cross-country1 flight time as pilot-in-command (PIC)
  • At least forty (40) hours of actual or simulated instrument time, including:
    • at least fifteen (15) hours of flight training with an authorized flight instructor, including:
      • at least three (3) hours of flight training with an authorized flight instructor within two (2) calendar months prior to the date of the checkride
      • instrument flight training on cross-country1 flight procedures, including one cross-country flight in an airplane with an authorized instructor that is performed under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), including:
        • a flight of 250 nautical miles along airways or by directed routing from an air traffic control facility
        • an instrument approach at each airport
        • three (3) different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems

1 For the Instrument Rating, the FAA defines cross-country flying as any flight that includes a landing at an airport more than fifty (50) nautical miles straight-line distance from the original point of departure.

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Speak with any of our Certificated Flight Instructors today and ask about an Introductory Flight!